In The Garden

Tulips on Parade

The tulips are in their prime right now and this gallery is a reminder that all the effort involved in planting them is worthwhile.

The dark bloom of tulip Black Hero
Yellow petals with a splash of red of Tulip Clusiana
Green, yellow and red provide a flame like effect on tulip flaming Spring Green
luxuriuos deep purple of Tulip Jan Reus
Another deep purple tulip - this time Negrita, I think
Pure white tulip Purissma
The Weird and wonderful tulip roccoco, it reminds me of a triffid
Fresh Green and cream leaves of Tulip Spring Green
Hints of purple and yellow on the Orange leaves of Whittallii
Tulip Albert Heyn, birds eye view
Tulip Ballerina in the sun
Tulip Jaqueline standing out against dark green hedge
The dark bloom of tulip Black HeroYellow petals with a splash of red of Tulip ClusianaGreen, yellow and red provide a flame like effect on tulip flaming Spring Greenluxuriuos deep purple of Tulip Jan ReusAnother deep purple tulip - this time Negrita, I thinkPure white tulip PurissmaThe Weird and wonderful tulip roccoco, it reminds me of a triffidFresh Green and cream leaves of Tulip Spring GreenHints of purple and yellow on the Orange leaves of WhittalliiTulip Albert Heyn, birds eye viewTulip Ballerina in the sunTulip Jaqueline standing out against dark green hedge

  1. Black Hero
  2. Clusiana
  3. Flaming Spring Green
  4. Jan Reus
  5. Negrita (I think)
  6. Purissima
  7. Roccoco
  8. Spring Green
  9. Whittallii
  10. Dior(in the background)
  11. Ballerina
  12. Jaqueline

Woodland Wonders

erythronium
hybrid blue bell
primrose - for hope
tulipa sylvestris
Wood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)
ErythroniumBluebell - I suspect a hybrid between the wild bluebell and its Spanish cousin, both of which are in the gardenPrimroseTulipa Sylvestris - the wild tulipWood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)
  1. Erythronium
  2. Bluebell – I suspect a hybrid between the wild bluebell and its Spanish cousin, both of which are in the garden. Spot the difference.
  3. Primose
  4. Tulipa Sylvestris – the wild tulip
  5. Wood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)

Although it is something of an exaggeration to call the area beneath the tulip tree a woodland, the dappled shade it creates and the gentle slope make it a perfect habitat for plants that like these conditions. Over the years I have added many layers of shredded bark that have created the damp humus-rich soil they like, so now I find they are self-seeding and spreading around with little intervention from me. I do love spring’s woodland plants.

The Useful Euphorbia

E. myrsinites in full flower

E. myrsinites

This is the time of year when euphorbias really come into their own as a perfect foil for spring bulbs. The larger varieties, including E.mellifera and E.wulfenii provide structure throughout the year, but with their spring topping of flowers, they add that wonderful acid green that works so well with tulips and narcissi. This year’s mild winter means that mellifera is flowering earlier than usual and the garden is already filled with the scent of honey on warm days. E. polychroma is a favourite in the borders where it looks great among the newly emerging herbaceous plants while the scaly-leaved stems of E.myrsinites coil sinuously over walls.

 

E. wulfenii in flower

E. wulfenii

E. mellifera in flower

E. mellifera

E. polychroma in bloom

E. polychroma

Plant Me Now to the rescue

polaroids of viola and hosta minutemanI’ve had a spring delivery of plug plants from Plant Me Now and will be planting up some new containers and filling in gaps where the wet winter did it’s worst. The plugs are good size and well-established so with warm weather forecast I should be able to plant them out after they have had a few days in the cold frame. I’m planning to plant the white-margined Hosta Minuteman in pots with an underplanting of Viola Labradorica – the deep coloured leaves and purple flowers will be a good foil for the hostas. On the basis that a shady garden can never have too many foxgloves, I’ve also got some of the Dalmatian series foxgloves, while the plants of Campanula Blue Bell are destined for a sunny spot in the border. I love campanulas, so I’m not sure why I’ve not had any in the garden up to now. If they like it here I will be delighted.

On the Verge

on the verge natural planting
A scheme in Scotland has come up with a roundabout way to grow flowers to help boost the bees. A study into the attractiveness to wildlife of urban sites sown with wildflower seeds has shown that roundabouts and road verges can easily be converted into flower-rich havens for bees and other wildlife by replacing grass with wild flowers. The simple schemes sowing wildflower seed mixes resulted in 50 times more bumblebees and 13 times as many hoverflies on unused corners of land in urban areas according to new research from the University of Sussex and the University of Stirling. The seeds were sown by the Stirling-based group On the Verge, with a seed mix that contained a range of meadow wildflowers of local provenance.