Logging On

Logging On

Given that we haven’t yet had a summer worth mentioning, it may seem unnecessarily pessimistic, but we have just had a log delivery. The advantages are that it’s a quiet time for our local woodsman so there’s no waiting for the delivery, and as we have a dry and airy log store they can stay there and continue seasoning until we need them. It’s hard work getting them from the driveway to the log store, but they look great once they are stacked and promise a cosy winter to come. Now all we need is some summer! log pile
wheelbarrows
log store

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RHS Wisley

RHS Wisley

It was our local allotment association’s annual day out – and for the fourth time in five years  they elected to go to Wisley.  It’s a good decision, because no matter what type of gardener you are, there are always things that will be of interest. I was hugely impressed by the new South African meadows which conjured up the real thing amazingly well, despite their cultivated surroundings. In the glasshouse I was stopped in my tracks by Brillantasia owariensis, while outdoors a planting of the carnivorous saracena looked very happy at the base of the Rock Bank  and alliums enlivened  the long grasses in one of the wilder corners of Wisley.  I will do future posts on other things that caught my eye.plants at wisley

South African meadows

South African meadows

Berkheyi in the South African meadows

Berkheyi in the South African meadows

Brillantasia owariensis

Brillantasia owariensis

Saracena

Saracena

aliums and grasses

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Great Dixter – again

Great Dixter – again

Well when you have one of the world’s great gardens nearby, it’s pretty irresistible. The team at Great Dixter were holding a press day, and although I know the garden very well, there are always things to learn, techniques to observe , new plants to see  and the ever-changing plantings to admire.  I will do later posts about some of the things I learnt and plants that caught my eye.

pots at entrance to great dixter

Fergus explaining how the ever-changing pot displays around the front door are put together

garden border in bloom

The current Courtyard pot display

 

Dixter Dachsunds are an integral part of the team

Dixter Dachsunds are an integral part of the team

on the ladder

The Turkish Tulip Poppy - Papaver glaucum, long-flowering and named because of the (upside-down) tulip-shaped buds.

The Turkish Tulip Poppy – Papaver glaucum, long-flowering and named because of the (upside-down) tulip-shaped buds.

The Turkish Tulip Poppy -close up. Available from Chiltern Seeds.

The Turkish Tulip Poppy -close up. Available from Chiltern Seeds.

Available from Chiltern Seeds.

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Fairlight End

Fairlight End

The June issue of Gardens Illustrated has a feature (written by me as it happens) about this impressive garden, so I was more than happy to take a friend and go along to support their NGS Open Day. Set on a steep hill, it is a garden that has achieved a perfect balance of cultivated and wild.  The house is set at the top of the hill overlooking the wooded undulations of the Sussex Weald. Helped by designer Ian Kitson, the owners have made a place of great atmosphere with the romantic borders and neatly trimmed topiary close to the house, gradually becoming increasingly informal as you descend the hill until you are in wildflower meadows that link perfectly to the surrounding countryside.  On reflection I think that this was my major reservation about the previous garden I visited – much of it did not relate sympathetically to its surroundings.farilight endflowers in doorwaydry bordertree prop

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