Tulips on Parade

The tulips are in their prime right now and this gallery is a reminder that all the effort involved in planting them is worthwhile.

The dark bloom of tulip Black Hero
Yellow petals with a splash of red of Tulip Clusiana
Green, yellow and red provide a flame like effect on tulip flaming Spring Green
luxuriuos deep purple of Tulip Jan Reus
Another deep purple tulip - this time Negrita, I think
Pure white tulip Purissma
The Weird and wonderful tulip roccoco, it reminds me of a triffid
Fresh Green and cream leaves of Tulip Spring Green
Hints of purple and yellow on the Orange leaves of Whittallii
Tulip Albert Heyn, birds eye view
Tulip Ballerina in the sun
Tulip Jaqueline standing out against dark green hedge
The dark bloom of tulip Black HeroYellow petals with a splash of red of Tulip ClusianaGreen, yellow and red provide a flame like effect on tulip flaming Spring Greenluxuriuos deep purple of Tulip Jan ReusAnother deep purple tulip - this time Negrita, I thinkPure white tulip PurissmaThe Weird and wonderful tulip roccoco, it reminds me of a triffidFresh Green and cream leaves of Tulip Spring GreenHints of purple and yellow on the Orange leaves of WhittalliiTulip Albert Heyn, birds eye viewTulip Ballerina in the sunTulip Jaqueline standing out against dark green hedge

  1. Black Hero
  2. Clusiana
  3. Flaming Spring Green
  4. Jan Reus
  5. Negrita (I think)
  6. Purissima
  7. Roccoco
  8. Spring Green
  9. Whittallii
  10. Dior(in the background)
  11. Ballerina
  12. Jaqueline

Why Mess with Perfection?

Green Pearl in flower in the garden

Green Pearl


Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. It is very easy to cross breed narcissus – and daffodil breeders have a lot to answer for. Contrast the simple perfection of Narcissus ‘Green Pearl’ which is in flower in my garden at the moment with two monstrosities that I saw recently at the RHS Spring Show. I think the pink frilly effort is called ‘Vanilla Ice’ but I failed to remember the name of the other.an ugly new variety of daffodildaffodil vanilla ice

Is Your Garden Gorgeous?

Beautiful English garden
If so, Alan Titchmarsh would like to know. To mark his 50th year in horticulture he is on the lookout for thirty of the nations best private gardens to feature in a programme being made by ITV. This is not about gardens that are grand, or laid out by famous designers – it’s about people with a passion for gardening who have transformed their own space in their own individual way. If you think your garden is a possible contender – or know someone else whose garden you can recommend – email Alan@spungoldtv.com with information about the garden, including its location and size and don’t forget your contact details.

Woodland Wonders

erythronium
hybrid blue bell
primrose - for hope
tulipa sylvestris
Wood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)
ErythroniumBluebell - I suspect a hybrid between the wild bluebell and its Spanish cousin, both of which are in the gardenPrimroseTulipa Sylvestris - the wild tulipWood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)
  1. Erythronium
  2. Bluebell – I suspect a hybrid between the wild bluebell and its Spanish cousin, both of which are in the garden. Spot the difference.
  3. Primose
  4. Tulipa Sylvestris – the wild tulip
  5. Wood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden)

Although it is something of an exaggeration to call the area beneath the tulip tree a woodland, the dappled shade it creates and the gentle slope make it a perfect habitat for plants that like these conditions. Over the years I have added many layers of shredded bark that have created the damp humus-rich soil they like, so now I find they are self-seeding and spreading around with little intervention from me. I do love spring’s woodland plants.

A Lovely Pile of Peasticks

a pile of peasticks to use as plant supports
I’ve recently visited the cobnut farm where they generously allow me to cram my car with their prunings. I am using the short twiggy ones for support in the borders while the taller ones will, in due course, be used for beans, peas and sweet peas.